You are here

Traditional Knowledge, Use, and Management of Living Marine Resources in American Samoa: Documenting Changes over Time through Interviews with Elder Fishers

Levine, A. and Sauafea-Leau, F. 2013. Traditional Knowledge, Use, and Management of Living Marine Resources in American Samoa:  Documenting Changes over Time through Interviews with Elder Fishers. Pacific Science, vol. 67, no. 3, early view.

This paper presents the results of interviews with elder fishermen in American Samoa. Fishermen interviewed during the study described: a decline in the quality of nearshore habitats and a decrease in the abundance of edible reef fish, including culturally important species (e.g. palolo). Populations of reef sharks and turtles were typically seen as stable or increasing.

The fishermen generated various recommendations for improving local fisheries, including: reducing runoff-related pollution and sediment, preventing destructive fishing methods, and establishing marine protected areas. This valuable information can be used in the development of conservation management plans.