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Between 1984 and 2016, about 16 percent of the world’s mudflats disappeared, according to a new data set from Australian researchers. Click on the link below to read the full article. 
Only around a third of the worlds remaining forest cover survives in the form of Intact Forest Landscapes (IFL), and that proportion is declining. Loss of intactness could impact on biodiversity in many ways but the relationship between...
The study investigated changes in the abundance of bird species inside and outside conservation areas over five decades. According to observations made by the researchers, conservation areas are excellent habitats for many species. Click on the link...
The Alliance for Zero Extinction has mapped 1,483 highly threatened species that are found only at a single site. But this major new assessment highlights the urgent need for better protection of these irreplaceable places. Click on the link below...
There has been a huge change in the native forest bird community in Wellington’s Zealandia sanctuary in the past two decades. Click on the link below to read the full article.
A Queenstown wildlife park has become the first in New Zealand to be recognised under the newest iteration of a progressive program for animal welfare at zoos and aquariums. Click on the link below to read the full article. 
The agricultural matrix has increasingly been recognized for its potential to supplement Protected Areas (PAs) in biodiversity conservation. This potential is highly contextual, depending on composition and spatial configuration of matrix elements...
The agricultural matrix has increasingly been recognized for its potential to supplement Protected Areas (PAs) in biodiversity conservation. Our study provides insights into the effects of different components of vegetation structure on the...
 New study has found that mixed agriculture-forest landscapes near protected areas can also be used to promote conservation of bird biodiversity. Click on the link below to read the full article.
Every year, proceeds from the British Birdwatching Fair go towards a conservation project, chosen and managed by BirdLife. We look back at the successes of the past 30 years. Click on the link below to read the full article.