marine pollution

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Every year, 8 million tons of plastic flow into the ocean and break down into microplastics. Because many organisms eat them, microplastics have the potential to crash marine ecosystems and leach poisons into our seafood. Click on the link below to...
With Australia facing a knife-edge federal poll on May 18, plastic pollution has become an election issue...The Australian Marine Conservation Society is urging voters to consider environmental issues during coming elections. Click on the link below...
Under assault from climate change, acidification, and a plastics barrage, the oceans get a boost from the marine reserve movement. Click on the link below to read the full article. 
This research takes a holistic approach to considering the consequences of marine plastic pollution. A semi-systematic iterature review of 1191 data points provides the basis to determine the global ecological, social and economic impacts. Click on...
An estimated 80 metric tons (88 tons) of heavy fuel oil escaped from the ship, but the government maintains that the full environmental impact of the spill remains to be determined. Click on the link below to read the full article. 
The organization's 2,000-foot-long cleanup tool was recently deployed in the Pacific Ocean, but it soon began spilling the plastic it had collected. Click on the link below to read the full article. 
Casey Jordan, an environmentalist, has replaced the plastic products in his bathroom with environmental-friendly alternatives in an effort to decrease the amount of plastic pollution in the oceans. Click on the link below to read the full article....
Residents affected by a massive oil spill in the Solomon Islands say the black tar on their beaches is part of a wider problem - a largely unregulated mining operation that's plundering their resources. Click on the below to read the full article....
Solomon Islands will change its shipping laws after the recent disastrous oil spill near a marine reserve. Click on the link below to read the full article. 
The UN's cultural body, UNESCO, says no oil from a disastrous spill in the Solomon Islands has reached a protected heritage site. Click on the link below to read the full article.