threatened species

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There is no denying, the authors write, that the destructive extinction trends, so visible across the planet, “have been less severe or avoided in areas held or managed by Indigenous Peoples and Local Communities…. Nature managed by Indigenous...
Ecological collapse and species loss threaten humanity as much as climate change. Conservationists say we're not listening.Click on the link below to read the full article. 
A skipper and deckhand were fined $7000 after Queensland Government staff raided their boat and found 31 shark fins on board at the port in Cairns. Click on the link below to read the full article. 
Japanese whaling vessels launched on Saturday the last round of what Japan calls scientific research off the Pacific coast ahead of the country's pullout from the International Whaling Commission next month for commercial hunting. Click on the link...
The inaugural meeting of the Cook Islands turtle society, Te Ara O Te Onu, was held on Wednesday to discuss the protection and conservation of turtles and elect its executive. Click on the link below to read the full article. 
A Northland island has been named among 107 islands globally that offer the best chance to save some of the world's most threatened species.Click on the link below to read the full article. 
New research shows that culling invasive, non-native animals on just 169 islands around the world over roughly the next decade could help save almost 10 percent of island-dwelling animals at risk of extinction. Click on the link below to read the...
Motukawanui, the largest of the Cavalli Islands, off Matauri Bay, is one of 107 islands around the world that have been identified by a major international collaboration of scientists, researchers and conservationists as offering the best chance to...
The shortfin mako, the world’s fastest known shark, which can reach speeds of up to 70 kilometers per hour (43 miles an hour), is one step closer to extinction. Click on the link below to read the full article.
A frequent NOAA Fisheries collaborator, Lars Bejder’s research has helped us better understand tourism’s effects on marine mammals. Click on the link below to read the full article.